1. 18:28 23rd Sep 2014

    Notes: 174

    Reblogged from laughingsquid

    image: Download

    laughingsquid:

‘Shoot the Moon’, A Documentary About the Quest to Build an Elevator to Outer Space
     
  2. 13:20 22nd Sep 2014

    Notes: 784

    Reblogged from laughingsquid

    image: Download

    laughingsquid:

A Massive & Now Complete Chart Comparing the Sizes of Famous Spaceships From Movies, TV Shows, & Video Games

Still no Culture crafts, though, so not really completr
     
  3. 02:17 21st Sep 2014

    Notes: 81

    Reblogged from sciencefictiongallery

    image: Download

    sciencefictiongallery:

Chris Moore - Emphyrio, 1998.

    sciencefictiongallery:

    Chris Moore - Emphyrio, 1998.

     
  4. 11:39 18th Sep 2014

    Notes: 190

    Reblogged from intergalacticmatter

    image: Download

    (Source: cosmiccantina)

     
  5. 14:10 15th Sep 2014

    Notes: 970

    Reblogged from palaiologoi

    70sscifiart:

    70sscifiart:

    A selection of art from Stewart Cowley’s Spacecraft, 2000-2100 A.D.: Terran Trade Authority Handbook, 1978. Artists featured include Angus McKie, Jim Burns, and Colin Hay.

    via || Buy the book

    Go beyond international literacy: Intergalactic literacy.

    *sigh*

     
  6. 22:03 12th Sep 2014

    Notes: 355

    Reblogged from officerofmonkeyproblems

    image: Download

    (Source: cosmiccantina)

     
  7. 13:40 11th Sep 2014

    Notes: 933

    Reblogged from intergalacticmatter

     
  8. 09:01 9th Sep 2014

    Notes: 244

    Reblogged from sciencefictiongallery

    image: Download

    sciencefictiongallery:

Jean-Francois Pénichoux

    sciencefictiongallery:

    Jean-Francois Pénichoux

     
  9. 16:26 5th Sep 2014

    Notes: 43

    Reblogged from bubblewrench

    The Outlook for Humanity
    -
    We sure are vulnerable. But we’ll be significantly less vulnerable once we can safely call ourselves a Type I civilization. What is our progress to this end? Well, as stated earlier, we’re about 75 percent there in terms of energy. The second aspect, survival, is more qualitative, but there are positive signs. Though we haven’t perfected interplanetary travel, we do have it. We send probes around our star system (and we even have a few on their way into interstellar space). Transporting humans between planets is merely an engineering issue, something we could have done already with sufficient effort and money. Without necessitating any major new discovery, we could build colonies in space near the Earth and moon or slightly further away, keeping at least a few thousand people safe from a planetary disaster, and that could be reality in a matter of decades. We’re making a little progress with earthquakes, at least learning how to detect them before they strike to give people some warning, although we can’t intervene to prevent them yet. We’re monitoring near-Earth objects like asteroids and at least discussing programs that would be directed at diverting any dangerous body from hitting Earth. And, amazingly, earlier this year researchers in Iceland drilled into magma that was intruding into the Earth’s crust, constituting a major breakthrough toward an ability to harness volcano power. Along with that would come an ability to siphon off the accumulating magma pressure that causes volcanic eruptions. So our capabilities hint that we are going in the direction of a Type I civilization. Will we get there fast enough? Nobody can say for sure, but it does look hopeful. And when we get there, there will still be quite a lot left to invent.
     
  10. 21:20 3rd Sep 2014

    Notes: 84

    Reblogged from mfkopp

    proteus7:

danismm:

Future office with typewriter, video recorder and photocopier, 1969

What future looked like: Work

Another example of the future that never was - but I think this inspired the set design of Star trek the next generation

    proteus7:

    danismm:

    Future office with typewriter, video recorder and photocopier, 1969

    What future looked like: Work

    Another example of the future that never was - but I think this inspired the set design of Star trek the next generation

     
  11. 11:41

    Notes: 7823

    Reblogged from throwinshade

    femburton:

    ok but let’s continue to talk about how next level this video janet jackson made 13 years ago was and what a flop the future turned out to be

     
  12. 15:48 2nd Sep 2014

    Notes: 2694

    Reblogged from soulvacancy666

    cinemagorgeous:

    John Harris.

     
  13. 14:56 29th Aug 2014

    Notes: 245

    Reblogged from bubblewrench

    wildcat2030:

    High-Flying Algae Airships are Self-Sufficient Airborne Cities
    -
    Architect Vincent Callebaut recently unveiled a blue-sky plan for a high-flying fleet of self-sufficient aircraft that are one part zeppelin cities and one part hydrogen-generating floating farms. Dubbed Hydrogenase, the algae-producing airborne cities are 100% emission-free and are capable of generating hydrogen gas without consuming land needed for crops or forests. (via High-Flying Algae Airships are Self-Sufficient Airborne Cities | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building)

     
  14. 17:34 28th Aug 2014

    Notes: 190

    Reblogged from mattressestimesamillion

    image: Download

    brucesterling:

*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.
http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph
About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.
In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”
In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.
Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

    brucesterling:

    *You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.

    http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph

    About the Book

    Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.

    In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”

    In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.

    Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 

     
  15. 08:18

    Notes: 655

    Reblogged from soulvacancy666

    image: Download

    artsytoad:

John Harris, Dhalgren

    artsytoad:

    John Harris, Dhalgren